Drawing of a possible design for a simple to construct Parabolic


Here is the mic (minus the microphone), reflector is a Telinga, others can be used, stay above 20" diameter. The nosepiece built to a level of cut away that can be done fairly easily with a number of different tools. The two disks clamping the reflector are rug castors with a hole drilled through them. Remaining construction is simple pipe cutting. Glue the joint between handle and T. The joints on the nosepiece should not be glued so you can mount the mic. Place foam around the mic, at the opposite end of the nose pipe, and bottom of the handle. Cover the handle with foam, etc. to reduce handling noise.

A recording with the setup as shown, Sony ECM-T140 Tie Tac Mic, Sony MZ-R30 MD.

Southern Leopard Frogs (50 & 100'), insects, at night. Also chicken house fans (800'), gas turbine power plant (2 miles)


If you have access to a milling machine or are otherwise adept, this is about as much as you can cut the pipe away. Note the plug in the pipe to keep sound from travelling through the piping to the mic. And a view of the mic wedged into the end with some foam.

A recording with this light nosepiece, Sony ECM-T140 Tie Tac Mic, Sony MZ-R30 MD

Insects 50+ feet, Jay (400-600'), Crows (800-1000'). Also chicken house fans (800', gas turbine power plant (2 miles), airliners, etc.


A design using a reflector that used to be available from www.amazing.com. Same diameter as the Telinga reflector, but flatter with a longer focus. The small plastic funnel acts as a barrier to help keep down pickup from the side. I used this setup to record frogs for more than two years before moving to the telinga.

A recording with this setup, Sony ECM-T145 Tie Tac Mic, Sony MZ-R30 MD

Southern Leopard Frogs (50 & 100'), insects, at night. Also chicken house fans (800'), gas turbine power plant (2 miles)


For comparison, recordings with the Telinga Pro V with DAT Stereo mic element, Sony MZ-R30 MD:

1. Mixed to Mono, as are all the above.

2. Original Stereo version

Southern Leopard Frogs (50 & 100'), insects, at night. Also chicken house fans (800'), gas turbine power plant (2 miles)


October 3, 2002 - wwknapp@mindspring.com